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Public Forum Working and Natural Lands - Shared screen with speaker view
Patrick Comins
20:39
There are several breakouts I would like to participate in. Bill Hyatt will try to participate in the rivers one and I the Forest one. The wetlands one is also very important to our group.
Chris Donnelly
21:25
There are several great breakouts. Will all 4 be recorded for later viewing / listening?
Rebecca French
28:33
All breakout sessions will have minutes taken for reviewing after the forum.
Starling Childs
31:02
Last slide had "agricultural conversation easements" Maybe a typo.
Patrick Comins
31:13
it seems we may have missed a slide
Patrick Comins
31:24
it was energy continued, but we didn't see the first
Rebecca French
31:51
We will have copies of all presentations available on the GC3 site in addition to a recording of the presentation.
Denise Savageau
38:27
In terms of solar installations of prime and important farmland, need to focus on protecting farmland first and foremost. Multiple use, including grazing under solar, should not be the preferred alternative just to allow solar. Normally grazing would not take place on prime farmland in the CT River Valley. We need to have strong recommendations not on soil health but also on the importance of maintaining farmland. Solar should not compete with farmland preservation. We can put solar on rooftops, we can't make more prime farmland.
Joseph Orefice
38:47
I cannot join the agriculture breakout because I need to be in a different one. But I'd like to comment as a farmer in the state and as a farmer in CT: 1. agricultural easements should be coupled with land access for beginning farmers and farm transitions. Funds should be allocated to purchasing easements and not rely as heavily on donations for the purchase of farm easement rights. 2. I am disappointed that agroforestry was not listed in the recommendations for agriculture. Alley cropping and silvopasture both have significant potential to improve carbon storage in farmland soil and provide overyielding per acre of CT's limited remaining farm acreage. If we can farm under solar panels (as suggested) then we can farm under some trees.
Patrick Comins
38:50
One thing I see missing so far is to assess what farmlands provide important habitat for wildlife and to protect wildlife habitats from things like renewable energy production. e.g. Grassland birds
Rebecca French
39:56
All working group reports: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Climate-Change/GC3/GC3-Working-group-reports
Meral Prewitt
40:31
So very glad you mentioned this Mr. Comins!
kip Kolesinskas
40:40
Agroforestry and silvopasture were recommended, just didn't show up on the slides. Definitely needs to be elevated in the report
Denise Savageau
42:37
VT has a comprehensive Farm to Plate program that could be used as a model for CT. It started as jobs creation legislation.https://www.vtfarmtoplate.com/
Rebecca French
43:53
Copies of slides, recording and minutes will be posted here: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Climate-Change/GC3/Public-Forums
Rebecca French
44:41
Feel free to use the chat to write comments or ask questions as we go along. The chat will be saved and provided to the working group.
Katie Lund
49:44
Heat stress to farmers and farm workers does not seem to be in the Agriculture report. Erosion was mentioned extensively as a result of declining soil health and extreme precipitation; however, sea level rise and general flooding were not mentioned.
Rebecca French
51:14
If you have not done so already (or answered survey emailed to you) send a private chat to Mary-beth Hart with your choice of break out session: Agriculture/soils OR Forests OR Rivers OR Wetlands.
Bill Hyatt
55:43
What would the definition of “forest” be for a no-net-loss forest policy?
Rebecca French
56:35
We like to learn about successful programs in your community related to the topics tonight. We heard about a model program for Food Systems Director in New Haven and we learned about a KNOX Hartford. Share a chat with programs you know about.
Rebecca French
57:11
https://www.knoxhartford.org/programs/tfhn/
Lee Cruz
58:01
Thank you Urban Resources Initiative and City of New Haven for our trees in New Haven http://uri.yale.edu/maps/street-tree-inventory-map
Kimberly Stoner
58:25
It isn’t Forest or Agriculture, but there is a very successful network creating pollinator pathways across the state. (Pollinator habitat includes trees and shrubs!) www.pollinator-pathway.org
Mary Pelletier
58:39
Park Watershed recommends increased protection of forests along riparian corridors, which can provide exponential ecosystem service benefits
Julia Cartabiano
59:35
Consider that replacement trees should be native and adapted to conditions they are being planted in
lynne bonnett
59:49
what happens to all of the damaged trees from storms? Is it sustainably used in some way?
Rebecca French
59:58
US Climate Alliance was formed after federal government pulled out of the Paris Climate Agreement. States in the US Climate Alliance pledged to continue to meet the goals of the agreement.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:00:40
I'm hoping there will be an effort to increase education of the public who are not tuned in or likely to see the recordings of these presentations. Tree cutting, especially, is something that happens all the time so that lawns can be expanded, view-sheds etc. Education is critical and goes hand-in-hand with government programming and regulatory efforts.
Chris Donnelly
01:01:51
Cynthia - yes. We cannot focus all of our efforts on public entities. The private tree owners, including individual home owners, need to play a role.
Denise Savageau
01:02:15
Great presentation on negative emissions. It is so important .
David Bingham
01:02:20
Eric
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:02:28
Thanks, Chris, and I think the home builders association could be a good group to include in this outreach effort.
David Bingham
01:02:50
Eric
Kathy Fay
01:02:53
That education is important in urban areas as well as other areas. Through my work I have encountered many city residents who are literally afraid of trees, or want them removed to pave backyard areas.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:03:14
yes, it's sad.
Doris Johnson
01:05:04
Understand city residents perspectives are base upon history among other variables
Kathy Fay
01:05:48
Yes to what Doris wrote!
kip Kolesinskas
01:05:54
Should also include irrigation water source as well
David Bingham
01:05:55
Eric - was there any discussion of expanding PA490 forest protection to include lots with fewer acres?
Chris Donnelly
01:06:05
Doris - yes. Everyone should know the history of redlining, among other issues.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:06:22
That's an excellent point, Doris.
Rebecca French
01:08:08
Have you picked out your break out session yet? They are all critical topics, but we ask you to choose one: Agriculture/soils; Forests; Rivers; or Wetlands. Send a chat to Mary-beth with your choice.
lynne bonnett
01:09:51
saltwater inundation also damages underground infrastructures that rust in the presence of salt water. One benefit of source control is resoration of ground water levels to be a better barrier to increased salt water intrusion; especially in cities such as New Haven that has ground water depletion from years of ground water pumping for personal use.
Doris Johnson
01:10:11
Reassess Kathy Fay after this last storm, I believe a large number of Connecticut residents’ fear of trees have increased
kip Kolesinskas
01:10:22
Need to protect headwaters areas, important recharge and discharge areas. We can identify these
Rebecca French
01:10:52
Have you noticed signs in and around a sewer drain in your neighborhood? When they say 'drains to watercourse' they are talking about rivers, lakes, and Long Island Sound.
Jerry Milne
01:10:55
The recommendations for so much passive management of CT's forests will outsource Connecticut's need for wood to other countries with less stringent environmental oversight. The recommendations will also negatively impact wildlife dependent on young forests.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:11:32
So, there's a huge crossover with inland-wetlands here. A lot of what is being said about rivers being naturally resilient are actually because of the riverine wetlands and wetlands higher in the landscape of a watershed.
Patrick Comins
01:11:42
Great! Connectivity is so important
Starling Childs
01:13:02
To Jerry Milne How much of the ash and oak currently being sod off of CT State forests and park lands is being processed and utilized here in CT?
Rebecca French
01:13:14
The weather is joining the forum tonight. I am watching the rain fall in West Hartford and thinking about where it goes.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:13:41
It's been raining in Bethlehem all day! Woo Hoo! we really need it.
Patricia Taylor
01:14:25
The health and environmental impacts of our wastewater treatment discharges, especially near our ash landfill and incinerators should be part of the climate change survey of our inland waters.
Katie Lund
01:14:31
Thank you for highlighting equity issues related to recreation.
Starling Childs
01:14:58
Most of our high value hardwood ends up being exported over seas or to Canada. Our use of wood for building necessarily comes from forests far from CT because eof building codes that are not favorable to local grown wood.
Rebecca French
01:16:04
Like "fish and faucet"
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:16:36
I would be interested in knowing if grey water usage was addressed. I understand some other states have easier regulations about this subject, that make it possible to use grey water responsibly.
lynne bonnett
01:16:40
Yes, I've been advised that minority populations in New Haven are afraid of our rivers because they can not swim. Some non profit efforts to increase recreational access to our rivers have difficulty recruiting youth to be river guides. It is important that we acknowledge this as you indicated. Most people are probably unaware of this barreir.
Lindsay Larson (HVA)
01:17:15
Echoing Katie Lund- thank you so much for noting the issues around equity in access to natural areas- definitely something we are thinking about over at HVA, in regards to public access along the Housatonic River.
Michael Jastremski, Housatonic Valley Association
01:17:55
Sorry this is going back to Eric's talk, I was pulled away for a moment- We at Housatonic Valley Association love the idea of a CT Youth Conservation Corps! HVA and our partners developed a similar idea out of the Still River Watershed Management Plan, called Still River Watershed Connections (https://hvatoday.org/still-river-connections/). The Connections program has helped install and maintain a variety of watershed restoration projects (including urban reforestation along impaired streams) identified in the Still River Watershed plan, while giving many hundreds of youth from the Danbury area opportunities to learn technical skills and develop a sense of stewardship for their hometown streams. We would love to connect with other organizations doing similar work in CT, and would be glad to help develop the idea of a statewide Youth Conservation Corps.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:18:00
Also, we could be looking at "living machines" better known as biotreatment facilities - which are based on created wetland models. these engineered systems treat sewage and have been shown to produce potable water as end result
Joanna Wozniak-Brown
01:18:01
For some reason, I showed up as Katie Lund.
Lindsay Larson (HVA)
01:18:25
Oh! *Echoing Joanna Wozniak-Brown, in that case :)
Kathy Fay
01:18:28
When doing stormwater management education in the city, I noticed that community gardeners immediately understood what I was talking about and its importance. Another urban group that understands are freshwater fishermen. Perhaps there can be funding to enlist more community residents to educate other community members, with support from State entities.
Joanna Wozniak-Brown
01:18:29
It was Joanna Wozniak-Brown with the comments on equity/recreation and Ag for farm worker heat, adding climate threats of SLR, flooding, drought
Lee Dunbar
01:19:05
Ever notice that forest trails often parallel a stream or take you to a pond or wetland view? Consider why that is. Streams provide a pathway into and through the forest and act as "gateway drug" for budding naturalists and nature appreciators and advocates for implementing the types of recommendations being put forward......
Denise Savageau
01:19:34
At the recommendation of the CT Council on Soil and Water Conservation, DEEP requested and has received funds through the Long Island Sound Study to update the Stormwater and Erosion&Sediment Control Guidelines. This is now in the works.
Aaron goode
01:19:50
New Haven has had a Youth Conservation Corps in the past, using 'Youth At Work' program funding https://www.energizect.com/new-haven%E2%80%99s-youth-conservation-corps-canvass-neighborhoods-promoting-importance-energy-efficiency
Julia Cartabiano
01:20:07
The state of Georgia has an outstanding citizen Adopt-A-Stream program that is very useful for monitoring stream health with a small budget
kip Kolesinskas
01:20:14
Need to specifically manage and reduce impervious surfaces beyond just low impact development principles and practices
David Blatt
01:21:11
Make stormwater utilities mandatory.
Patricia Taylor
01:21:27
A great local program that is well-established is Harbor Watch at Earthplace in Westport. They are a great model - http://earthplace.org/harbor-watch/
Susan Masino
01:21:44
I love the comment about urban streams as a gateway drug for budding naturalists :)
Aaron goode
01:21:48
New Haven attempted to create a storm water autbority and user fee in 2010 but bungled the politics and it was never authorized by the city council
Aaron goode
01:22:06
https://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/city_moves_to_take_authori/
Rebecca French
01:23:44
Good point Aaron. All of these recommendations require strong governance and participation in the process. What can we learn from New Haven? What went right in New London where they did adopt a stormwater utility.
Kathy Fay
01:23:56
I like the idea of making stormwater authorities mandatory because it would help get around the local politics and misconceptions people had about "attempting to tax tax-exempt organizations"
Kathy Fay
01:25:21
Think of what are the local tax-exempt entities with large parking lots...
Denise Savageau
01:28:40
Moving forward to 2021, I strongly recommend tackling water resources as ONE Water. with two subgroups. 1) Inland Wetlands and Watercourses (which includes rivers, lakes, etc) in one group and 2) Estuarine Wetlands and near coastal waters
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:29:02
Agreed
Shelley Green
01:30:36
+1 on the One Water approach, Denise.
kip Kolesinskas
01:31:03
loss of snow pack, less midwinter snow leads to less recharge and the more runoff you mentioned.
pete Aarrestad
01:31:32
Denise and Cynthia, what is the basis or rationale for you r recommendation?
Rebecca French
01:31:53
In our past wetlands were not always seen as a valuable ecosystem and were often filled in. Haver you heard the phrase 'drain the swamp?" Not a good idea when it comes to keeping our water clean and protecting our communities from flooding.
Lee Dunbar
01:33:24
Any discussion regarding water resources MUST include an accounting for groundwater. Groundwater is linked to flows in surface waters as well as runoff from impervious surfaces that influence groundwater recharge. If policy is to be based on "good science" then groundwater cannot be separated from surface water and wetlands.
Patrick Comins
01:33:50
also going back to rivers, I want to be sure that the importance of watersheds are covered within the recommendations.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:33:57
Pete, from my perspective as a soil/wetland scientist, I like that our state law regulates open water bodies (streams, ponds, lakes, and intermittent watercourses) under the wetland law. It makes sense when evaluating and assessing wetlands because you can see clearly in the field the connections between all these systems. It is really ONE system as part of the hydrological cycle.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:34:44
Even, the isolated wetlands and vernal pools are connected through infiltration.
Bill Hyatt
01:34:47
My recollection from the 2011 climate vulnerability assessment is that tidal wetlands and cold water streams were the two most vulnerable habitats.
Patrick Comins
01:34:48
I would change shorebirds to coastal birds. Shorebirds are something specific
kip Kolesinskas
01:35:07
We also now recognize subaqueous soils and can map and interpret them
Rebecca French
01:35:27
Vocab moment - attenuate wave action means soft shorelines like wetlands (as opposed to seawalls and rip rap (rock walls)) absorb energy from waves and make them smaller and reduce their ability to cause erosion.
Kathy Fay
01:37:48
Agree, on One Water, but glad these subcomittees split up in this round and were able to get into this much depth. For the public, it is confusing for rivers and other water systems to be found Working and Natural Lands. Lands and Waters as the overall heading.
Rebecca French
01:38:09
One last reminder to send your break out session selection through a private chat to Mary-beth. Pick one of the four topics you learned about tonight - Agriculture; Rivers; Forests and Wetlands
David Blatt
01:39:00
Any consideration of a statewide minimum setback from tidal wetlands?
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:39:30
So much of the coastline is already developed, right up to the beach
lynne bonnett
01:39:40
what about weighing in on the airport expansion plans in New haven in a coastal wetland? it's federal - how can the GC3 have input on federal actions?
Rebecca French
01:39:50
David B. - there are recommendations around that topic, but not sure if that was specifically recommended. Please take a closer look and provide feedback.
kip Kolesinskas
01:39:50
Need more training and oversight of municipal IW commissions and staff. We have done an ok job of protecting the "regulated area but not a good job of protecting the hydrology. Changes needed to the regs?
David Blatt
01:41:45
DEEP’s statewide IW program consists of one person. We need more resources before considering anything more than tweaks to the Inland Wetlands Act.
Lee Dunbar
01:42:08
I really hate to "go negative" but I think we all need to realize where the resistance will come from. If we "protect" farmland, forest, wetlands, and river corridors where do we propose to allow future development to occur? Can't say "no" to everything everywhere and expect success.
Peter Picone
01:42:43
I would like to get in forestry breakout
Denise Savageau
01:42:43
The CT Council and the Conservation Districts have offered to help DEEP with the inland Wetland Program
kip Kolesinskas
01:42:44
Agreed, DEEP needs more staff and resources in many areas- important to this climate change priority!
Peter Sonia
01:43:48
me too - Forests - please