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Environmental Justice Webinars - Shared screen with speaker view
Arielle King
31:59
Link to webinar series recordings : https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Climate-Change/GC3/Equity%20and%20Environmental%20Justice%20in%20Climate%20Solutions%20Webinar%20Series
Arielle King
33:02
Young Voices for the PlanetWeb: https://www.youngvoicesfortheplanet.com/Facebook: @youngvoicesfortheplanetTwitter: @YoungClimate
Arielle King
34:03
Connecticut League of Conservation VotersWeb: https://www.ctlcv.org/Facebook: @ctlcvTwitter: @ctlcv1
Arielle King
34:44
Sunrise CTFacebook: @sunriseconnTwitter: @sunriseconnInstagram: @sunrise_connecticut
Patricia Taylor
43:54
What do advocates in your generation call climate change? Alex mentioned the term changed from global warming to climate change, and that made a difference to him. Are you hearing it called climate crisis?
Stephanie Bahramian
44:59
There is no question that top-down measures are needed for significant change, but what are you young leaders doing either as individuals or as educational outreach coordinators to reduce the levels of consumption that we have all come to take for granted. There is room for improvement in all our lives, so I would like to hear about some concrete examples of how our DEMAND for goods and services is being reduced as we seek to change the models we currently have in place to meet those demands.
Mark Mitchell
45:08
What do you think of Greta Thornburg being the face of youth regarding climate change?
Anthony Cherolis (he/him) - Transport Hartford
45:35
Great attendance today with 97 folks! As a 41-year-old, I definitely didn't have kids partly due to impending climate catastrophe. I think that pressure and stress may be even higher on the generation behind me.
Kim Stoner
45:36
What would intergenerational climate justice look like to you?
Claire (she/her) Sickinger
45:56
How can agencies like DEEP better communicate about the work they’re doing and the changes they are implementing to increase public awareness of the positive steps that are happening (particularly with young people)?
Tiffany Mellers
46:16
That my BABY talking right there. lol
Doris Johnson
47:39
Good afternoon Tiffany
Anthony Cherolis (he/him) - Transport Hartford
49:24
Question - Do you find institutions and (typical) commisions of non-diverse folks over age 40 working against creative proposals and ideas coming from younger activists and racial/economic/environmental justice advocates? If yes, how can we help dismantle or reform those oppressive systems?
Anthony Cherolis (he/him) - Transport Hartford
51:04
(the "we," being existing environmental orgs and those already working within these institutions interested in being better allies)
Marlon Hyde
51:42
Is it possible to pollute ethically?
Tiffany Mellers
52:49
It was scary having a baby and even more scary when she has an asthma attack and it comes from the environment.
Marlon Hyde
52:50
What will it take for environmental racism to get the spotlight it did in 2016 when the Flint, Michigan water crisis rose to the public's attention?
Marlon Hyde
54:01
Thank you all for doing the work that you do!
Anthony Cherolis (he/him) - Transport Hartford
55:53
@Alex - You're on the hook for canvassing and door knocking if you're putting others on the hook for public office. ;)
Mary Pelletier
58:02
Please note that there have been a number of “middle-age” (not young) individuals who have worked tirelessly to study, conserve and revitalize nature. It would be swell to be recognized for individual efforts, rather than age, wealth or ethnicity.
Andy Danzig
59:38
It's strange having a program titled "Intergenerational" with only one generation represented. While it is great and gives me hope to hear from these young activists, this discussion would be enhanced by including representatives of Gen X and Boomers. Especially because there has been lots of talk of political change, yet the younger generations typically participate the least in the political process.
Mark Mitchell
01:01:54
In the past, global threats--such as overpopulation, mass starvation, and the increasing hole in the ozone layer--have been solved by a combination of education, political will and technology. Are you optimistic that climate change will be solved in time?
Marlon Hyde
01:03:30
Growing up in New York, I had a asthma attack at 5 years old. I had no idea what was going on, I just knew I could not get air. How do we educate more people that things like asthma, lead poisoning, and cancer can be related to a lack of pollution controll?
Sharon Anne Byron
01:03:32
1970 First Earth Day. 1986 Rocky Mountain Institute. Emory Lovins. Nothing new. Connecticut is SLOW to divest infossil fuels. Everyone (regardless of color, shade,etc) is impacted by dirty air, dirty water, dirty energy, dirty soil(). Solution is for EVERYONE to contribute to the clean air, water, soil, and energy.
Ashley Zane
01:03:57
I'm guessing that many times older individuals say that it's nice to stand on principles, but actually acting on issues like clean energy costs money passed on to rate payer which you don't pay as someone under 18. How do you bridge that gap and what methods have been the most effective in your opinion when responding?
Lynn Johnson
01:05:07
Wow! Thank you Alex, Jaysa and Sena for speaking truth to power! I continue to be inspired by you to fight hard for your future. Jeff, good facilitation! Thank you all!
Kim Stoner
01:06:24
Are you following the court case Juliana vs. United States - young people across the US who are suing the US government to take action against climate change? Would legal action be another route youth could be taking?
Patricia Taylor
01:08:31
How do you feel about political dialogue that weighs what is profitable for business with what is harmful to the environment?
Steph Stroud (NPS)
01:10:54
Thank you for your work providing clarity to issues and speaking the unpopular and necessary truth to people in power. In a perfect world, the youth would not have to tell older generations how to lead! Hopefully we can learn to listen and even more importantly, act.
Diane
01:12:52
What is your point of view on alternative energy sources?
Starley Arias
01:14:48
Massachusetts has a tree planting project that is showing success. It's called the Greening the Gateway Cities Project
Shawn O'Sullivan
01:16:30
Why not have DEEP work with EDUCATION to possibly incorporate streaming of meetings into Social Studies and Science curricula.
Ashley Benitez Ou
01:19:21
Also climate change education should be place-based and students, young people and other member of communities should understand better their own vulnerabilities and the vulnerabilities of their region.
Hugh hdbirdsall@aol.com
01:23:33
thank you for education ideas,
Sharon Anne Byron
01:24:30
Climate Crisis and Climate Catastrophe are appropriate. 2030 is the goal. NOT 2050.
Arielle King
01:25:25
Ways to contact the panelists: Sena WazerLinkedin: Sena WazerFacebook: Sena WazerInstagram: @senawazerJaysa Hunter-MellersE-mail: Hunterjaysa@gmail.comAlex RodriguezE-mail: alex@ctlcv.org
Sharon Anne Byron
01:26:01
The only way to do better is to hunker down and start planting trees where they can.
Diane
01:27:17
Great hearing these points of view. Carry on!
Doris Johnson
01:27:24
DEEP Environmental Education staff provide climate change education statewide.
Marlon Hyde
01:27:32
Thank you everyone!
Loretta
01:27:35
Thank you to all the presentes. What a grand hope to know you are working so hard for the planet.
Rebecca French
01:27:36
Dream team!
Patricia Taylor
01:27:37
This was fantastic. Thank you to the speakers, host, and organizers.
Ashley Benitez Ou
01:27:43
Thank you!
Kim Stoner
01:27:44
Thank you!
Mary Pelletier
01:27:44
thanks!
Diane Hoffman
01:27:45
Great job Panelists! Thanks to everyone who organized the series
Patrick Comins
01:27:46
Thank you!
Amy Paterson - CLCC
01:27:49
Outstanding conversation, panelists and faciliation, Jeff. An inspiring way to wrap up this series.
Kirsten Rigney
01:27:50
Thank you!
Starley Arias
01:27:50
Thank you!
Parkermar
01:27:52
Thank you
Mary Pelletier
01:27:55
nice work