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Municipal Composting: Case Studies & Updates - Shared screen with speaker view
Amanda Fargo-Johnson
54:05
Very informative, thanks Athena!
Jim Hyde
54:29
What type of biomass or carbon is added to the VT examples? and sources of any additions?
Santiago Rojas
55:33
maybe he hasn't pushed the audio connection button
Santiago Rojas
55:42
at the bottom on the left
Sherill Baldwin
55:54
what are some of the issues with uncovered and open facilities in winter.
Amanda Fargo-Johnson
56:58
Or Telephone:Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):US: +1 312 626 6799 or +1 646 876 9923 or +1 301 715 8592 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1 253 215 8782Meeting ID: 913 3940 2256
Santiago Rojas
57:04
I wouldn't recommend uncovered or open facilities in rainy locations. You should either cover the compost or build roofs. If not you'll have to deal with lots of wastewater to treat.
CT DEEP
59:03
Please put questions in here. Cory will facilitate questions to speakers at the end of the presentations.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:01:08
Could Doug expand on why there is no market for composted wood chips? Seems counter-intuitive.
Stephanie Bahramian
01:01:50
Yes, can the woodchips not be processed into mulch?
George Page
01:07:10
joined late, the term "feed stock" is confusing. Are you referring to the food scraps that are added to the compost system?
Coryanne Mansell
01:08:44
Hi George, Thanks for joining us! Feedstock can refer to the material going to the compost site, in this case food scraps, but can also include leaf/yard debris.
George Page
01:09:25
Are you able to sell your finished compost? Is it tested?
Genevieve Morgan
01:11:33
Thanks, Doug. Very helpful presentation.
George Page
01:16:02
How much was the investment in kits?
doug colter
01:20:25
The City of West Haven can't compost wood chips because it takes 4 years without a nitrogen component. The windrows take up too much real estate, as they have to be kept small in order to help prevent fires from spontaneous combustion. The mulch companies are not interested in taking our wood chip waste because they are getting plenty of free chips from the tree companies delivered to them for free. It costs too much to load and truck wood chips.
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:21:55
Thanks, Doug. That's too bad, but totally understandable.
Derek Faulkner
01:21:59
Thanks Doug
Carey Hurlburt
01:22:04
Is New Milford Farms still accepting food scraps in 2020?
doug colter
01:23:21
The machinery needed to process wood chips into mulch costs $450.00 per hour, so it is a net loser to us for the minimal value of municipal mulch. We process our annual brush intake by selling compost back to the tub grinder operator at $8.00 a yard. If we make more compost, we can sell more to fund wood chip management.
doug colter
01:28:00
If you need expert professional help I highly recommend Domingo Medina, Phd, in New Haven. You can reach him through CT NOFA.
doug colter
01:29:33
Thanks Jennifer! Very helpful, well organized
Genevieve Morgan
01:29:53
Super helpful presentation, thank you
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:30:33
Domingo will be speaking at the October virtual compost conference session.
CT DEEP
01:31:58
Permitted Food Residual Composting Facilities in CT https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Waste-Management-and-Disposal/Organics-Recycling/Food-Residual-Composting-Facilities
CT DEEP
01:41:54
Q for Dave - Do you expect to be collecting food scraps from all SCRRRA towns? Are you working with one hauler or a series of haulers? And how will you expect residents to give/bring food scraps? Cart? Bags? Curbside pick up? Same/different haulers?
doug colter
01:43:00
nice project Dave!
Jorge Montezuma, Atlas Organics
01:43:28
Dave--are you piloting only the GORE ASP system or are you piloting other systems?
Diane Lauricella
01:44:12
All presentations were terrific! Thankyou!
Cynthia Rabinowitz
01:51:23
Very informative. thank you!
Dawn Pettinelli
01:55:06
Maybe Novamont?
Carey Hurlburt
02:00:23
Ugly fruit and veggies?
George Page
02:07:08
Is there any sort of guide that can help people gain traction with local municipalities in creating/encouraging local compost programs?
doug colter
02:10:13
Biodegradable plastic breaks down into the components of plastic, not organic material that can be used for soil health
Genevieve Morgan
02:10:38
Thank you everyone
Carolyn Bayne
02:10:45
Thank you!
Michelle Andrews
02:10:51
Thank you, great job to all the speakers.
George Page
02:11:06
great stuff!
Michele Cohen
02:11:06
thanks
Cynthia Rabinowitz
02:11:08
Great job, Coryanne!