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Environmental Justice Webinars - Shared screen with speaker view
pestanae
30:34
Hi Everyone
Heather Burns
31:28
Hello - Heather Burns, CT Sustainable Business Council here. Excited about this session!
Arielle King
35:45
https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/News-Releases/News-Releases---2020/Governors-Council-on-Climate-Change-Kicks-off-Public-Review-and-Forums-Period
Arielle King
37:26
https://usdac.us/nativeland
Arielle King
37:57
Webinar slides: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Climate-Change/GC3/Equity%20and%20Environmental%20Justice%20in%20Climate%20Solutions%20Webinar%20Series
Hugh hdbirdsall@aol.com
43:04
Will you be making recommendations about climate crisis education in Connecticut public schools?
Andy Danzig
45:38
I see these wonderful webinars are being recorded. What is the link where they can be viewed? TY
Deja Curtis (she/her/hers)
47:21
@Andy The recordings have yet to be posted but when they are, you will be able to find them at: https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Climate-Change/GC3/Equity%20and%20Environmental%20Justice%20in%20Climate%20Solutions%20Webinar%20Series
Kathy Fay
50:43
I am very curious about who from the GC3 (and generally) are availing themselves of the excellent webinars in this series.
Marianne Engelman-Lado
53:14
See Principles of Environmental Justice, which emphasize the right of communities — and those most impacted o— to participate “as equal partners at every level of decision-making, including needs assessment, planning, implementation, enforcement, and evaluation.” See Principle 7 at The clip is good, though perhaps not quite inspirational.
Marianne Engelman-Lado
53:41
Mistake — the reference was supposed to be to https://www.ejnet.org/ej/principles.html.
Marianne Engelman-Lado
58:08
(Just so no one misinterprets, the “clip” comment was on my clipboard and had nothing to do with this presentation. Sorry for any confusion! Dr. MItchell is, as always, inspiration.)
Diane Hoffman
58:16
legislators should be here!
Peg Hall
01:00:20
When siting a necessary and potentially-polluting facility, and let's presume it's to service a region, not just a single municipality, clearly the pollution needs to be minimized. Beyond that, if said faciity brings needed jobs, and if there are HIGH host community benefits/payments, how would one keep such facilities from being sited in communities most in need of the jobs and the money, without having NIMBY keep facilities from being sited anywhere?
Gannon Long
01:06:11
Peg Hall, you're describing exactly the current struggle in CT. what's worse is, many times the jobs in those facilities don't go to low income folks who live nearby; so even those fleeting economic benefits don't get realized for residents in the neighborhoods bearing the worst pollution.
Jeremy Evans
01:07:42
Can anyone explain the significance of the GC3? I have little to no knowledge on what they do and their importance.
Steven Wallett
01:08:54
https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Climate-Change/GC3/Governors-Council-on-Climate-Change
Andy Danzig
01:08:58
Peg Hall: One key is proper engineering. For example, there are several solid waste to energy technologies available that can capture virtually all pollutants of concern. Another key is equitable financing of building and operating such facilities which may cost more than polluting technologies.
Marianne Engelman-Lado
01:09:03
On September 3, 2019, Governor Ned Lamont issued Executive Order No. 3, re-establishing and expanding the membership and responsibilities of the Governor’s Council on Climate Change, also known as the GC3. The GC3 was originally established in 2015 by Governor Dan Malloy. In addition to continuing to address mitigation strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, the newly expanded GC3 will also consider adaptation and resilience in the face of climate change impacts.On September 3, 2019, Governor Ned Lamont issued Executive Order No. 3, re-establishing and expanding the membership and responsibilities of the Governor’s Council on Climate Change, also known as the GC3. The GC3 was originally established in 2015 by Governor Dan Malloy. In addition to continuing to address mitigation strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, the newly expanded GC3 will also consider adaptation and resilience in the face of climate change impacts.See https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Climate-Change/GC3/Governors-Council-on-Climate-Change.
Marianne Engelman-Lado
01:09:35
GC3 was reestablished by the Governor to address mitigation strategies to reduce greenhouse gases and consider adaptation and resilience in the face of climate change impacts.
Arielle King
01:10:40
Please feel free to keep sending questions in this chat in preparation for the Q&A session
Kathy
01:10:56
My request is that in the discussion of vulnerable populations, and environmental justice inequities, the GC3 tie in plastic pollution in our oceans and communities. Plastic is both a health matter and a source of carbon emissions - as plastic is made with fossil fuels and vulnerable populations live with pollution and near the factories/landfills etc. Can anyone comment on this?
Claire (she/her) Sickinger
01:12:36
Is it better to implement climate policies/programs that provide short term fixes to the most vulnerable people (BIPOC) but aren’t sustainable because they don’t fully address the long term issues? Or to take more time to find a sustainable and long-term solution that will take longer to implement but will address issues more fully for vulnerable communities?
Kathy
01:13:00
There are many local organizations who focus on coastal issues and environmental justice who are important to the conversation. What environmental ocean focused organizations are currently involved?
Peter Ludwig
01:13:40
Are there local groups doing community organizing who may not see themselves as EJ groups, but actually have the community leadership and relationships to conduct effective EJ work?
Arielle King
01:13:45
Still muted
Susan Quincy
01:15:01
The DEEP offers educational support to classrooms that connect to standards. contact susan.quincy@ct.gov for resources and support.
Rebecca French
01:15:13
Climate education is required to be taught in Connecticut public schools. https://ctmirror.org/2019/05/28/after-lengthy-debate-climate-change-curriculum-bill-passes-house/
Wayne Cobleigh
01:15:31
See this recent publication from Rice University and University of Pittsburgh:http://news.rice.edu/2018/08/20/natural-disasters-widen-racial-wealth-gap/ The Financing Adaptation Working Group has cited this study in our need for equity lens for our investments in community resiliency.
Doris Johnson
01:15:36
https://ncse.ngo/climate-change-education-legislation-over-connecticut
Doris Johnson
01:16:03
https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Education/Curriculum/Environmental-Curriculum---Climate-Change
Arielle King
01:18:04
Muted again
Doris Johnson
01:18:05
https://ncse.ngo/mandatory-climate-change-education-bill-connecticut-again
Patricia Taylor
01:18:06
Would you consider funding for adequate basic health care to vulnerable communities to be an example of adaptation equity in the face of climate change?
Hugh hdbirdsall@aol.com
01:18:12
Actually it is not required, it is only allowed to be taught.
Hugh hdbirdsall@aol.com
01:18:32
The bar is set very low.
Susan Quincy
01:18:37
correct is allowed to be taught.
Doris Johnson
01:19:17
The previous web links support Rebecca French and Sue Quincy's statement on climate change education in Connecticut schools
Kathy Fay
01:20:50
one place where the difference between equality and equity stands out starkly is the test for how the ratepayer funds for energy efficiency incentives are spent. it is based on how much ratepayer funds are received from a given census tract and how closely that aligns with expenditures on incentives in that same tract. Need is completely disregarded. How can people address this situation in a public forum?
Kathy
01:21:00
https://www.whoi.edu/multimedia/hurricanes/
Kathy
01:23:03
Fantastic discussion of hurricanes, climate and environmental justice last night hosted by Woods Hole. Featuring Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, marine biologist, founder of Ocean Collectiv and Urban Ocean Lab, and Dr. Jeff Donnelly, WHOI senior scientist and marine geologist. Do watch! Dr Johnson is amazing and did a program at the Bushnell last winter as part of their speaker series.
Diane Lauricella
01:23:56
In order to help site facilities, where can Town Zoning staff obtain asthma rate concentration maps? What type of asthma data including map overlays, are available and how can we see them? TK
Patricia Taylor
01:25:54
http://c-hit.org/asthma-hospitalizations-by-community/
Wayne Cobleigh
01:25:59
Agree we need to make health impacts of climate change personal for people to act on it
Patricia Taylor
01:28:13
https://portal.ct.gov/DPH/Health-Education-Management--Surveillance/Asthma/Asthma-Surveillance
Anne Hulick
01:29:10
Agree with you Wayne and Dr. Mitchell. I'm struck by how health professionals including my nurse colleagues don't make these connections between climate change and health.
Rebecca French
01:30:43
Please join for Working and Natural Lands GC3 Public Forum on 9/29
Jeremy Evans
01:30:48
Thank You!
Deja Curtis (she/her/hers)
01:30:51
Thanks everyone!
Gwen Oliver
01:30:53
Thank you!
Amy Paterson (CLCC)
01:30:55
Thank you, again, Dr. Mitchell for another informative presentation.
Samantha Dynowski she/her CT Chapter
01:30:57
Kathy Fay and all, DEEP is seeking comments on Equity in Energy Efficiency here:http://www.dpuc.state.ct.us/DEEPEnergy.nsf/c6c6d525f7cdd1168525797d0047c5bf/12c36ce3c4b5a80c852585d80046845f/$FILE/Notice%20of%20Equitable%20EE%20Proceeding%20&%20Req%20for%20Written%20Comments.pdf
Lee Cruz
01:30:57
thank you Dr. Michelle.
Patrick Comins
01:31:03
great presentation. Thank you@
Katie Katrichis
01:31:06
thank you!
Kathy Fay
01:31:34
thank you great presentation!
Diane Lauricella
01:32:58
Thank you Dr. Mitchell!